wanderthewood:

Mt Tamalpais, Marin County, California by michael ryan photography

wanderthewood:

Mt Tamalpais, Marin County, California by michael ryan photography

do-brave-things:

o-k-compooper:

souschen:

i think instead of the woman taking her husband’s name when they get married or doing the hyphenated thing

couples should just smash their last names together

so like if a Smith married a Grabowski you could be Smabowski or Grabith or Grasmithski

and then as the generations go on the names just get more and more ridiculous

why aren’t we doing this

So basically real-life ship names

gnasting:

sexual orientation: alone

fashion-runways:

PAOLO SEBASTIAN Autumn/Winter Bridal Collection 2014

ruhks:

pictures from todays train trip

Make me choose between:

Blog: ___________ or ___________

Music: ___________ or ___________

Band: ___________ or ___________

Actor: ___________ or ___________

Actress: ___________ or ___________

Singer: ___________ or ___________

Movie: ___________ or ___________

Book: ___________ or ___________

Ship: ___________ or ___________

audrey-molinatti-art:

my version of rapunzel( japanses folk tale style) when the evil witch cuts her hair ^^ 

audrey-molinatti-art:

my version of rapunzel( japanses folk tale style) when the evil witch cuts her hair ^^ 

awwww-cute:

Obedience

awwww-cute:

Obedience

humansofnewyork:

“People waste way too much energy taking things personally. That Facebook post is probably not about you. It was probably an accident that you weren’t tagged in that picture. And the person you’re dating is probably acting sad because that’s how they respond to setbacks at work, not because of anything you did.”

humansofnewyork:

“People waste way too much energy taking things personally. That Facebook post is probably not about you. It was probably an accident that you weren’t tagged in that picture. And the person you’re dating is probably acting sad because that’s how they respond to setbacks at work, not because of anything you did.”

awwww-cute:

This is Finn. He thinks everyone he meets is his best friend so he sits by the door waiting for people

awwww-cute:

This is Finn. He thinks everyone he meets is his best friend so he sits by the door waiting for people

memily:

adorabelledearheart:


thepliablefoe:


Norwegian forest cats are the best.
They look like little snow lions.


MORE REASONS WHY NORWEGIAN FOREST CATS ARE THE BEST:
The colloquial term for them is “skogkatten”.
They’re also called “fairy cats” in Norway, because they’re so pretty.
They run down trees headfirst.
They’re fricking gigantic and they purr really loud.
They literally walk over snow like motherloving Legolas.
In Norse mythology, skogkatts pull the goddess Freya’s carriage.
Who doesn’t want a carriage pulled by cats?
Viking cats. End of story.


Oh what a terrible thing it appears that I haven’t reblogged these glorious beasts this year yet

memily:

adorabelledearheart:

thepliablefoe:

Norwegian forest cats are the best.

They look like little snow lions.

MORE REASONS WHY NORWEGIAN FOREST CATS ARE THE BEST:

The colloquial term for them is “skogkatten”.

They’re also called “fairy cats” in Norway, because they’re so pretty.

They run down trees headfirst.

They’re fricking gigantic and they purr really loud.

They literally walk over snow like motherloving Legolas.

In Norse mythology, skogkatts pull the goddess Freya’s carriage.

Who doesn’t want a carriage pulled by cats?

Viking cats. End of story.

Oh what a terrible thing it appears that I haven’t reblogged these glorious beasts this year yet

goodstuffhappenedtoday:

Sixth-Grader’s Science Fair Finding Shocks Ecologists

When 12-year-old Lauren Arrington heard about her sixth-grade science project, she knew she wanted to study lionfish. Growing up in Jupiter, Fla., she saw them in the ocean while snorkeling and fishing with her dad.
Her project showed that the lionfish can survive in nearly fresh water. The results blew away professional ecologists. The invasive species has no predators on the Florida coast, so if they were to migrate upstream in rivers, they could pose a threat to the ecosystem.
"Scientists were doing plenty of tests on them, but they just always assumed they were in the ocean," Lauren, now 13, tells NPR’s Kelly McEvers. "So I was like, ‘Well, hey guys, what about the river?’ "In the beginning, she wanted to conduct her test by placing the lionfish in cages at different points in the river, but she had to simplify the project.
"It was just a small, sixth-grade project, and I really didn’t have all the tools necessary," she says. Her dad, who has a Ph.D. in fish ecology, suggested that she put the fish in tanks instead.
Lauren then put six different lionfish in six different tanks where she could watch her subjects closely. Lauren was given a strict set of rules by the science fair organizers. The most important one: Her fish could not die.
Lionfish had been found to live in water with salt levels of 20 parts per thousand. But no one knew that they could live in water salinity below that.
One of the six lionfish was her control fish, and the rest were the experimental fish. Every night for eight days, she would lower the salinity 5 parts per thousand in the experimental tanks. On the eighth day of her experiment, she found her experimental fish were living at 6 parts per thousand. She was amazed.
Her research did not stop there. Craig Layman, an ecology professor at North Carolina State University, confirmed Lauren’s results. “He credited a sixth-grader for coming up with his idea,” Lauren says ecstatically. Layman’s findings were published this year in the science journal Environmental Biology of Fishes. Lauren is mentioned in the acknowledgments.
Lauren’s father says he talks about science with her a lot. “We’re a science bunch of dorks in our family,” he tells McEvers.

goodstuffhappenedtoday:

Sixth-Grader’s Science Fair Finding Shocks Ecologists

When 12-year-old Lauren Arrington heard about her sixth-grade science project, she knew she wanted to study lionfish. Growing up in Jupiter, Fla., she saw them in the ocean while snorkeling and fishing with her dad.

Her project showed that the lionfish can survive in nearly fresh water. The results blew away professional ecologists. The invasive species has no predators on the Florida coast, so if they were to migrate upstream in rivers, they could pose a threat to the ecosystem.

"Scientists were doing plenty of tests on them, but they just always assumed they were in the ocean," Lauren, now 13, tells NPR’s Kelly McEvers. "So I was like, ‘Well, hey guys, what about the river?’ "

In the beginning, she wanted to conduct her test by placing the lionfish in cages at different points in the river, but she had to simplify the project.

"It was just a small, sixth-grade project, and I really didn’t have all the tools necessary," she says. Her dad, who has a Ph.D. in fish ecology, suggested that she put the fish in tanks instead.

Lauren then put six different lionfish in six different tanks where she could watch her subjects closely. Lauren was given a strict set of rules by the science fair organizers. The most important one: Her fish could not die.

Lionfish had been found to live in water with salt levels of 20 parts per thousand. But no one knew that they could live in water salinity below that.

One of the six lionfish was her control fish, and the rest were the experimental fish. Every night for eight days, she would lower the salinity 5 parts per thousand in the experimental tanks. On the eighth day of her experiment, she found her experimental fish were living at 6 parts per thousand. She was amazed.

Her research did not stop there. Craig Layman, an ecology professor at North Carolina State University, confirmed Lauren’s results. “He credited a sixth-grader for coming up with his idea,” Lauren says ecstatically. Layman’s findings were published this year in the science journal Environmental Biology of Fishes. Lauren is mentioned in the acknowledgments.

Lauren’s father says he talks about science with her a lot. “We’re a science bunch of dorks in our family,” he tells McEvers.

orlansky:

This is one of those photos that was just meant to be. Someone made an ice sculpture that spelled RAW in Union Square. I thought it was more meaningful spelled backwards, so I went around to the other side. Before I could take a shot, someone knocked over the R. Then a little kid stood on it. Then…never mind, just look at her pants.

orlansky:

This is one of those photos that was just meant to be. Someone made an ice sculpture that spelled RAW in Union Square. I thought it was more meaningful spelled backwards, so I went around to the other side. Before I could take a shot, someone knocked over the R. Then a little kid stood on it. Then…never mind, just look at her pants.